Winter Dry Skin and Your Child

  • By GoDigital Test Account
  • 05 Jul, 2016

Winter can be rough in many ways, especially on your skin. As the temperatures drop outside, the heaters turn on indoors, which robs moisture from the air and from your skin. Dry skin can be particularly irritating for children and infants, who can’t just reach for the lotion bottle whenever their skin is getting uncomfortably itchy. Follow these tips to help prevent dry skin problems in your child this winter:

* Avoid harsh soaps. Instead, opt to wash your child in mild cleansers (look for packaging that includes words like “gentle” or “sensitive”).
* Use moisturizers often, especially while your child’s skin is still a little wet. Applying to damp skin after washing helps trap in the moisture. When choosing a product, avoid any with alcohol listed in the ingredients and know that ointments are the most moisturizing, followed by creams and then lotion.
* Have your child wear gloves whenever you go out into the cold to prevent chapped hands.
* Use a cool-mist humidifier in your child’s room to help put moisture back in the dry air.
Is your child or infant already suffering from dry skin this season? Here’s what you can do to help treat it:
* If your child has skin that is red or itchy, you can apply over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream for relief. Hydrocortisone use should be limited to a one week trial. If the red, itchiness persists beyond that it is important to see your doctor.
* If you’ve been using a lotion on your child’s skin but it hasn’t been helping, purchase something stronger like a cream or ointment.
* Bathe your child less often, or make bath times shorter. Also, go easy on the soap!

If none of the above provides any relief, and your child’s skin stays stubbornly dry, give English Road Pediatrics a call and let us have a look! Your child may have eczema and could benefit from a prescription cream rather than an over-the-counter moisturizer. Browse our website for office information or call (585) 225-2525 to schedule an appointment today!

By GoDigital Test Account 05 Jul, 2016

Summertime Schedules for Children
The last day of school is on the horizon and it’s time to start thinking about transitioning your kids from their school schedule to summer. While some kids might think it’s a free-for-all, it’s important for your kids to stay on a structured schedule during summer vacation.

Creating a summer schedule might not seem like any more fun for you than it does for your child, but rest assured you’ll both have no trouble adapting.   Studies suggest   children can lose academic gains made during the school year over the summer. By encouraging mental stimulation throughout the summer, parents can help children maintain math, reading, and spelling skills. A schedule will keep your child’s new freedom from becoming aimless and wasteful, and will actually help make better use of their time. If you’re met with any resistance, tell your child a well-planned schedule means it’s easier to pack more fun activities into their day.

If you’re not sure how to get started, it’s best to list out any summertime activities. This can include anything from reading books and playing sports to chores and educational activities. Include any and all activities your children may partake in on a daily basis, and try to draft a schedule based on what you come up with. Your schedule will want to map out wake up and bed times, meal times, and all the activities in between. If a schedule isn’t working out – that’s fine! It’s yours to tweak and customize as you please. Eventually you and your child will fall into a summertime schedule that works – as long as you stick with it! And if you’re stuck on activity ideas, we have a few suggestions:

  • Picnics and park outings
  • Summer reading programs at the local library or summer sports leagues
  • Camps – educational, sports, or overnight
  • Scheduled family trips
  • Volunteering in the community or finding a neighborhood job (for older children)

If this seems like you’re over-scheduling your family, try not to worry about it too much. Kids actually thrive on routine, and there’s more risk to having too little structure than there is to having too much of it. And if you’re concerned at all with your child’s level of activity or lack thereof in the summer months, don’t hesitate to contact English Road Pediatrics. We’ll be happy to answer your questions or provide you with fresh suggestions! Give us a call at   585-225-2525   or visit our   website   for more information about English Road Pediatrics.

By GoDigital Test Account 05 Jul, 2016

Warmer weather is here to stay and that means your kids will be spending a lot of their time outdoors. Playing sports has long been a spring and summertime tradition for children, but with these activities comes the need to exercise caution and good safety practices. Here’s what you can do to help your kids prevent injuries while playing their favorite sports:

 

  1. Wear Protective Gear.   Helmets are most common and should be used in many sports. They’re also the most important because they protect your child’s head from serious injury. Make sure your child wears the proper helmet for the sport he or she is playing – baseball helmet for baseball, bicycle helmet when riding bikes, roller skating, or skateboarding. Depending on the sport being played, your child should also be fitted with mouthguards, wrist, elbow, and knee guards, and for boys, a protective cup.
  2. Do Proper Warm Ups.   Make sure your child warms up before playing. This includes stretching and some light jogging to get the body tuned up and ready to play. Having your child properly warmed up will help prevent sports injuries like sprains and pulled muscles.
  3. Know the Rules.   Making sure your child is familiar with the rules of the sport he or she is playing will lessen the likelihood of injury. If every child on the field knows what position he or she is supposed to be in, and follows the rules of the game, fewer injuries happen.
  4. Be Mindful of Others.   A lot of rules in sports are designed not only to effectively play the game, but also to protect the players. The sports field is a safer place if everyone is mindful of each other – for example, your child yelling “I got it!” when he or she is about to catch a fly ball will help prevent collision with another outfielder.
  5. Don’t Play When Injured.   If your child happens to get injured while playing sports, that’s the time to call it quits for a while. Your child may be tempted to get right back into the game, but allowing them to play while injured can do further damage. Talk to your child about the importance of being honest when they’re hurt, and explain to them they’ll need to sit it out until their injury has had a chance to fully heal. If they get back to playing too quickly, it could make their injury worse and thus increase their time on the sidelines.

 

If your child does happen to get injured, don’t hesitate to bring them into   English Road Pediatrics . Our compassionate doctors are all board-certified in pediatric medicine with decades of combined pediatric care experience. You can breathe easy knowing your child is in the most capable hands at English Road Pediatrics!

By GoDigital Test Account 05 Jul, 2016

Although it’s hard to avoid in this day and age, too much screen time can be damaging to young children. The  AAP  has long advised to avoid screen time in infants entirely until age 2, and then allow a maximum of two hours a day of screen time for children over the age of 2 – a lofty goal that might not be very realistic anymore thanks to the convenience of smartphones, tablets, DVR, and Netflix. Regardless of your child’s age, though, limiting screen time (or at the very least reducing it) is important for cognitive development.

 

Since complete screen time abstinence is usually out of the question, what can you do as parents to be sure the media your child is exposed to isn’t damaging in the long run?

 

  • Make it count. Be sure whatever television program you’re allowing your child to watch is at the very least educational. For toddlers especially, there’s a plethora of wonderful programming geared toward teaching young children. When watched in moderation, educational programs can actually increase your child’s learning rather than hurt it. As a parent, avoid the urge to just keep the TV going on at all times with the news, reality shows, soap operas, or sports. Save the adult programming for when the children are sleeping as much as you can.
  • Watch with them. The best way for your child to watch TV is if you or a caretaker is watching it with them. This way you can engage your child about what they’re seeing, and explain to them anything that may need explaining. Ask your child questions to keep them engaged in the learning aspect of the program you’re watching. By watching television right alongside your children, you’ll also better be able to monitor what is being watched and how much screen time they’re getting.
  • Set strict limits. As a family, you’ll want to come up with a schedule or allot a certain amount of screen time allowed in your household. The parents and caretakers should be on the same page, so the child isn’t finding one adult being more lenient with letting them watch TV than another. Create a schedule or a time limit and stick to it as much as you can. As tempting as it can be to let the television or tablet babysit just a little longer, it’s important for your kids to have structure in set schedules, and real-world interaction with parents and peers has a lot more value than watching characters on TV or playing them in video games.

 

At English Road Pediatrics, we agree with the general consensus that too much screen time is not a good thing for your child’s development. Nothing can replace the importance of real-life situations, interactions, and exploration. There are sometimes good lessons to be learned in educational programming, but the best lesson your child will learn comes directly from you, as their loving parent or caregiver. If you have any questions or concerns about screen time, please don’t hesitate to bring it up with your pediatrician at your next appointment, or give us a call at 585-225-2525 to speak with one of our friendly and knowledgeable nurses. At  English Road Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine , we care about your child’s continued health and development!

By GoDigital Test Account 05 Jul, 2016

Winter is long, and no one wants to keep their kids cooped up indoors from November to March. So how can you avoid cabin fever while simultaneously keeping your kids safe when playing outdoors? Follow these tips from English Road Pediatrics!

 

  1. Dress them appropriately.   Regardless of how actively your kids will be playing while outside, it is of the utmost importance to dress them for the cold. That means layers like long underwear, warm pants and sweaters for insulation, and outerwear that is water- and wind-proof. The benefit of dressing your child in layers is that if the outdoor activity is strenuous, you can just remove the outermost layer to prevent overheating. Hats, mittens, scarves, and waterproof boots are also a must!
  2. Keep them hydrated.   In the summer heat, it’s easier to remember to drink water because you feel hot, sweaty, and parched. In the cold of winter, it is just as important to drink water and stay hydrated during and after activities. To make it extra fun for your kids, start a wintertime tradition of serving them hot chocolate after they come in from outdoor play. It will help warm them up as well as keep them hydrated!
  3. Slather them with sunscreen.   This one is easily and often forgotten in the wintertime. Just because it isn’t hot out, doesn’t mean the sun’s rays can’t do their UV damage. Put sunscreen on any skin that is left exposed after dressing your child for the outdoors.
  4. Be wary of ice.   If you plan on taking your children ice-skating, or let them play on any body of water that is frozen, make sure the ice is at least 6 inches thick before you walk on it. If you’re unsure about the thickness of the ice, don’t risk it! It’s better to be safe than sorry. And always make sure you have a plan in place, like emergency contact numbers at the ready, in case the ice were to break.

 

Following the above tips will help keep your children safe when playing outdoors this winter. It is important to note that children should never play outdoors if the temperature or wind-chill falls below -13°F (-25°C). Be sure to check the weather forecast before making any plans to send the kids outside, and know that even milder cold temperatures can be dangerous too. If you have any other questions about cold weather safety or if your child gets injured while playing outside, don’t hesitate to call English Road Pediatrics at 585-225-2525.

By GoDigital Test Account 05 Jul, 2016

Winter can be rough in many ways, especially on your skin. As the temperatures drop outside, the heaters turn on indoors, which robs moisture from the air and from your skin. Dry skin can be particularly irritating for children and infants, who can’t just reach for the lotion bottle whenever their skin is getting uncomfortably itchy. Follow these tips to help prevent dry skin problems in your child this winter:

* Avoid harsh soaps. Instead, opt to wash your child in mild cleansers (look for packaging that includes words like “gentle” or “sensitive”).
* Use moisturizers often, especially while your child’s skin is still a little wet. Applying to damp skin after washing helps trap in the moisture. When choosing a product, avoid any with alcohol listed in the ingredients and know that ointments are the most moisturizing, followed by creams and then lotion.
* Have your child wear gloves whenever you go out into the cold to prevent chapped hands.
* Use a cool-mist humidifier in your child’s room to help put moisture back in the dry air.
Is your child or infant already suffering from dry skin this season? Here’s what you can do to help treat it:
* If your child has skin that is red or itchy, you can apply over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream for relief. Hydrocortisone use should be limited to a one week trial. If the red, itchiness persists beyond that it is important to see your doctor.
* If you’ve been using a lotion on your child’s skin but it hasn’t been helping, purchase something stronger like a cream or ointment.
* Bathe your child less often, or make bath times shorter. Also, go easy on the soap!

If none of the above provides any relief, and your child’s skin stays stubbornly dry, give English Road Pediatrics a call and let us have a look! Your child may have eczema and could benefit from a prescription cream rather than an over-the-counter moisturizer. Browse our website for office information or call (585) 225-2525 to schedule an appointment today!

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